Spelling out the Benefits Part Two: Creating a verbal bridge

In the recent Spelling out the Benefits Part One post, I explained that it is best to follow a feature with the statement “What this means to you is…” or “Which means…”

This builds a verbal bridge between the feature and the benefit.  Other linking phrases that create this verbal bridge include:

  • What will be particularly helpful for you is…
  • This enables you to…
  • The benefit of this to you is…
  • This allows you to…
  • So that you can…
  • As a result…
  • So you will be able to…
  • So what you’ll immediately experience is…

Sometimes, you may feel that to spell out the benefit will be a statement of the obvious. However, it is dangerous to assume that your customer will automatically translate the feature into benefits that have value for them.  Play it safe. Preface your bridging statement with a phrase such as:

  • As you will realise…
  • As you will be aware…
  • As I’m sure you will appreciate…
  • Which of course means…

This way you have reminded your customer of the benefit without implying they are an idiot. This ensures that the value of what you are offering is apparent to the customer.

Visual courtesy of Shutterstock

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Jurek Leon is a storyteller, speaker and trainer. Subscribe to Jurek's FREE monthly 'Terrific Tips' e-newsletter at http://www.terrifictrading.com/terrific-newsletter/. Alternatively, email info@terrifictrading.com.